The BEST Core exercises for moto racing… (pt. 1)

7 Jul

Every racer has an opinion on core exercises. Some racers swear by crunches and sit ups as seen in many riding books and online articles. These books are very good when it comes to riding technique. I own a handful of them!* (See bottom of post).

Unfortunately, each book contains only a short section/chapter on fitness. It touches on the very basics of fitness training and the exercises and recommendations are not specific to riding high performance race bikes. They are simply recommendations that I would give to any average Joe wanting to lose weight.

But when you really look at the forces at play on the track, you begin to see that we probably need something a bit more specific than simply doing crunches. After all, are we really lying on our back pulling our torso off the ground when we are on the track?

So shouldn’t we have something a bit more specific for riding? So here’s what this post is going to do: First, take a look at the riding position. Weight is forward, braced by legs and arms. This is just in a static position. Now obviously when we accelerate, brake or corner, momentum and inertia will place different forces on the bike and our body.

So looking at straight acceleration.  If acceleration is strong enough to lift the front wheel, it’s strong enough to push your torso up as well. But at the same time, we are holding onto the bars and will be trying to lean forward without pulling on the front end of the bike. The action created here is actually the abdominal muscles resisting spinal extension and contracting in an isometric (no change of length) fashion.

The exercise that I recommend for this is a Stability Ball Rollout. Now you can do this with an ab wheel or to make it even more challenging use a TRX or Jungle Gym. But make no mistake, this exercise is probably going to be the first one you go to in your trackday fitness training. Aim for 2-3 sets of 20 repetitions.

The next sequence to consider is in line braking. The forces during this skill will push the body forward. At this point we want to minimize the movement and contribution of the rider’s weight to destabilize the bike. We need to be still, but able to feel the bike. Generally, stability ball knee tucks are good for this exercise. To make it even more challenging, try to do a push up after you’ve brought your knees to your chest. 

Another great exercise that is a bit more dynamic is a reverse bear crawl. This exercise utilizes an arm pushing motion while maintain core stability. Both are great and if you can implement them both into your program, do it! Aim for 2-3 sets of 20 repetitions.

As you can see, when deciding which exercises are the best for our trackday needs, the more specific you can be the better. Motorcycle racing is different than any other sport because the forces are magnified exponentially by the speeds we reach as well as the fact that our body mass has a much greater contribution to the movement of the motorcycle.

In the next blog post, I’ll explain how we can train our core to better cornering and what exercises are the best for this part of racing. Until then, ride well, train hard!


Total Control by Lee Parks

Smooth Riding the Pridmore Way by Reg Pridmore

Twist of the Wrist II by Keith Code and Doug Chandler

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